ESIC first report convicts 37 CS:GO esports coaches
viewr
0
share +10 coins
September 28, 2020

ESIC first report convicts 37 CS:GO esports coaches

The Esports Integrity Coalition has banned at least 37 CS:GO coaches for abusing an in-game exploit. ESIC will release one more report after it concludes its CS:GO cheating investigation towards the end of October.

Michal Slowinski and Steve Dudenhoeffe first discovered the CS:GO coaching scandal that has cast a shadow over competitive integrity in the title. ESIC since banned three CS:GO coaches for durations ranging from six months to twenty-four months. The coalition then commissioned the duo for further investigations, the first report of which released today.

ESIC Bans 37 CS:GO Coaches

Acting on the report, ESIC bans 37 coaches for varying durations. The coaches in question were found guilty of using the coaching bug to gather information and secure an unfair advantage in competitive matches. The coaching bug use even dates back to 2016 and thousands of professional matches are under the scanner.

CS:GO coaching exploit turns results after cheating scandal investigated by ESIC.

ESIC released its first report on the CS:GO coaching exploit, finding thirty-seven coaches guilty of unfair practices. Image credit to ESIC.

Who Abused the CS:GO Coaching Bug?

There are 37 names, including Nicolai “HUNDEN” Petersen, Ricardo “dead” Sinigaglia and Aleksandr “MechanoGun” Bogatyrev include coaches of top CS:GO esports teams.

Interestingly, the report convicts former FaZe Clan coach Robert “RobbaN” Dahlström of abusing the bug during an ECS Season 7 match against Astralis. Other notable names include Mariusz “Loord” Cybulski, Faruk “pita” Pita, Allan “Rejin” Petersen, Slaava “Twista” Räsänen and more.

Here is the full list of coaches who abused the visual exploit.

  • Slaava “⁠Twista⁠” Räsänen (2 cases) – 15.75 months (12.50% concessions)
  • Peter “⁠casle⁠” Sørensen (2) – 10 months (0%)
  • Rodrigo “⁠dinamo⁠” Haro (2) – 10 months (0%)
  • Arno “⁠ArnoZ1K4⁠” Junior (1) – 10 months (0%)
  • Allan “⁠Rejin⁠” Petersen (7) – 19.8 months (45%)
  • Eliomar “glou” Hernandez (2) – 10 months (0%)
  • Arthur “⁠prd⁠” Resende (5) – 10 months (0%)
  • Alexey “⁠NooK⁠” Kozlovskiy (1) – 7.5 months (25%)
  • Henrique “⁠rikz⁠” Waku (1) – 10 months (0%)
  • Alessandro “⁠Apoka⁠” Marcucci (6) – 5.4 months (85%)
  • Aleksandr “⁠zoneR⁠” Bogatiryev (16) – 36 months (0%)
  • Germán “hellpa” Morath (2) – 10 months (0%)
  • Egor “fuRy^” Morin (1) – 7.5 months (25%)
  • Aset “⁠Solaar⁠” Sembiyev (2) – 10 months (0%)
  • Nicolai “⁠HUNDEN⁠” Petersen (2) – 8 months (20%)
  • Ricardo “⁠dead⁠” Sinigaglia (5) – 6.5 months (35%)
  • Nicholas “⁠guerri⁠” Nogueira (2) – 4 months (60%)
  • Faruk “⁠pita⁠” Pita (2) – 10 months (0%)
  • Erik “⁠AKIMOV⁠” Akimov (1) – 7.5 months (25%)
  • Ivan “⁠F_1N⁠” Kochugov (6) – 8.75 months (12.50%)
  • Bruno “⁠ellllll⁠” Ono (3) – 10 months (0%)
  • Pedro “⁠peu⁠” Lopes (2) – 5 months (0%)
  • Robert “⁠RobbaN⁠” Dahlström (1) – 5.5 months (45%)
  • Mariusz “⁠Loord⁠” Cybulski (2) – 6 months (40%)
  • Anton “⁠ToH1o⁠” Georgiev (2) – 10 months (0%)
  • Andrey “⁠Andi⁠” Prokhorov (1) – 10 months (0%)
  • Milan “⁠pepik⁠” Gellebra (1) – 10 months (0%)
  • Morgan “⁠B1GGY⁠” Madour (3) – 7.5 months (25%)
  • Christian “⁠chrille⁠” Lindberg (2) – 10 months (0%)
  • starix⁠ (1) – 10 months (0%)
  • Alexander “⁠ave⁠” Holdt (1) – 6 months (40%)
  • Jasmeet “⁠RoSeY⁠” Gill (1) – 10 months (0%)
  • Sergey “⁠lmbt⁠” Bezhanov (3) – 7.5 months (25%)
  • Henrik “⁠FeTiSh⁠” Christensen (1) – 3.75 months (25%)
  • Mikołaj “⁠miNirox⁠” Michałków (1) – 3.75 months (25%)
  • Nikolay “⁠pNshr⁠” Paunin (1) – 3.75 months (25%)
  • Casper “⁠ruggah⁠” Due (1) – 3.75 months (25%)

The first report was published after the analysis of just 20 percent of available data amounting to 99,650 demos. Until more information arises, CS:GO fans can expect the final report at the end of October to close the investigation.

Coaches can appeal the decision by writing to the Chairman of Independent Disciplinary Panel, Kevin Carpenter at [email protected]

CS:GO Cheating Scandal

The CS:GO coaching exploit allowed in-game coaches to adopt a static spectator view on any part of the map. They received a 360-degree view of the entire area, granting vision of enemy positions and movements.

So far, ESIC granted coaches a confession period where coaches could confess their guilt. Though punishment is still given, coaches who confess can receive shorter bans.

  • Confession prior to the investigation announcement – 40% ban period reduction.
  • Confession accepted in full – 25% ban period reduction.
  • Confession accepted partially – 12.5% ban period reduction.
  • Confession Rejected – 0%.
  • Assistance in the investigation – 20% ban period reduction.

The report also details the methodology used in arriving at the duration of the bans.  A special mention was made of Rivalry, DreamHack, and WePlay! Esports for their voluntary contributions to cover the cost of the investigation.

“ESIC is a non-profit association which often faces large operational burdens in its efforts to maintain integrity within the esports industry,” ESIC said in a statement. “Your commitment to integrity is valued and appreciated.”

ESIC’s report follows Valve’s punishment for teams whose coaches abused the visual bug. Valve said it might consider limitations to coaching. This news is a blow to CS:GO esports and fans everywhere as many teams now struggle with punishments.

Check out Esportz Network’s podcast about coaches with host Mitch Reames.

Written by Rohan Samal

Leave a Reply